11 Best Ethical Hacking Courses on PluralSight To Take In 2020

11 Best Ethical Hacking Courses on PluralSight To Take In 2020

Are you interested in learning Ethical Hacking?

Ethical hacking which is also sometimes referred to as penetration testing, red teaming, or intrusion testing, is the process of attempting to penetrate computer systems and networks

With the intention of locating weaknesses and vulnerabilities that could be exploited by malicious hackers.

Any information uncovered during this process is then used to improve the system’s security and plug loopholes.

Sounds interesting?

If your answer is yes, then this article is for you.

In this article, I have put up some of the best Ethical Hacking courses on PluralSight that will jumpstart your cybersecurity career.

After signing up for any of these PluralSight courses for Ethical hacking, you’ll also need to equip yourself with some of the best tools for ethical hacking. 

That’s why in this other article I reviewed some of the best Ethical hacking tools a hacker must learn, if you are interested in learning about these tools, you should check it out.

Now, let’s get into it.

Here are some quick links to these courses on PluralSight.

COURSESDURATION
1. Ethical Hacking Course1 h 28 min
2. Ethical Hacking: SQL Injection4 h 16 min
3. Ethical Hacking: Hacking Web Applications4 h 25 min
4. Ethical Hacking: Reconnaissance/Footprinting3 h 36 min
5. Ethical Hacking: Scanning Networks4 h 51 min
6. Ethical Hacking: Session Hijacking3 h 54 min
7. Ethical Hacking: Hacking Web Servers1 h 33 min
8. Ethical Hacking: Enumeration4 h 40 min
9. Ethical Hacking: Malware Threats1 h 36 min
10. Ethical Hacking: System Hacking1 h 37 min
11. Ethical Hacking: Social Engineering2 h 18 min

Here is a detailed summary of what you’ll learn in each of these Ethical Hacking courses on PluralSight.

We’ll look at what each course is about, what you’ll be able to do after the course as well as the requirements and skill level you need to have before starting any of these courses

1. Ethical Hacking Course

This best selling course on PluralSight will significantly benefit security officers, network administrators, and anyone who is concerned about the integrity of their network infrastructure.

This course will start you down the path of you becoming an Ethical Hacker, or in other words; become a “Security Profiler.” 

In this Ethical Hacking course on PluralSight, you will learn to start thinking and looking at your network through the eyes of malicious attackers

You will also learn to understand the motivation of an attacker. 

As you may have already known, it is your duty as a System Admin or Security Professional to protect your infrastructure from not only outside attackers, but also attackers within your company. 

These are some of the topics that the instructor will cover in this course to help you accomplish this task: 

  1. Terminologies used by attackers 
  2. The difference between “hacking” and “ethical hacking
  3. Phases of hacking 
  4. The types of attacks on a system 

This course is part of the Ethical Hacking Series

Rating: 4,.5 stars (1, 198 ratings).

Level: Beginner.

Updated: 17, September 2019.

Duration: 7 hours 37 minutes.

2. Ethical Hacking: SQL Injection

This Ethical Hacking course on PluralSight takes you through how to detect SQL injection… and identify risks as you become an ethical hacker with a strong SQL injection understanding

The ability for attackers to run random queries against vulnerable systems can result in Data exposure, modification, and in some cases, entire system compromise

SQL injection is classified as the number one risk on the web today due to the “perfect storm” of risk factors. It’s easily discoverable, easily exploited, and the impact of a successful attack is severe

If you add this to the fact that injection risks remain rampant, it’s clear how it deserves that number one spot. 

This course takes you through everything you need to learn to hone your skills like:

  • Understanding the SQL syntax used by attackers
  • Basic injection attacks
  • Database discovery and data exfiltration
  • Advanced concepts
  • Even using injection for network reconnaissance and running system commands

The course is everything an ethical hacker needs to know to be effective in identifying the SQL injection risk in targeting systems. And this is why I added it in this list of the best Ethical Hacking courses on PluralSight

This course is part of the Ethical Hacking Series

Rating: 4.5 stars (455 ratings).

Level: Beginner. 

Updated: 16, September 2019.

Duration: 5 hours 25 minutes.

3. Ethical Hacking: Hacking Web Applications

Understanding how to detect and identify risks in your web applications is absolutely critical

This best PluralSight course for Ethical Hacking goes through the risks in depth.

The security profile of web applications is enormously important when it comes to protecting sensitive customer data, financial records, and reputation

Yet, web applications are frequently the target of malicious actors who seek to destroy these things by exploiting vulnerabilities in the software. 

Most attacks against web applications exploit well-known vulnerabilities for which tried and tested defenses are already well-established

Learning these patterns, both those of the attacker and the defender is essential for building the capabilities required to properly secure applications on the web today. 

In this Ethical Hacking course on PluralSight, you’ll look at a range of different security paradigms within web applications both conceptually and in practice. 

They’ll be broken down by the Instructor into details, exploited, and then discussed in the context of how the attacks could have been prevented. 

This course is part of the Ethical Hacking Series

Rating: 4.5 stars (382 ratings).

Level: Beginner.

Updated: 8, October 2015.

Duration: 4 hours 49 minutes.

4. Ethical Hacking: Reconnaissance/Footprinting

This best PluralSight course for Ethical Hacking covers the process of probing a system with the intent of compromising the target. 

The goal is to gather as much data as possible about a would-be target.

As an Ethical Hacker, you’ve been asked to do a “Blackbox” attack on a customer’s infrastructure. 

What would be your first step?

Well, your first step is finding out as much as you can about the “target.” You accomplish this via reconnaissance/footprinting. 

This is the initial stage in gaining a blueprint of the security profile of a target, and it is accomplished in an organized manner. 

Reconnaissance is one of the three “pre-attack phases,” and results in a unique profile of an organization’s networks and systems. 

Reckoning” an organization is necessary in order to systematically gather all the related data in regard to the technologies deployed within the network. 

Reconnaissance can take up to 90% of the time during penetration testing or an actual attack. The instructor will show you how attackers are currently reckoning your company, as well as discuss in detail the steps of reconnaissance

Finally, you’ll look at some possible countermeasures to help discourage attackers. 

This Ethical Hacking course on PluralSight is part of the Ethical Hacking Series

Rating: 4.5 stars (343 ratings).

Level: Beginner.

Updated: 28, September 2018.

Duration: 3 hours 42 minutes.

5. Ethical Hacking: Scanning Networks

In this best selling course on PluralSight, the instructor assumes you already know how to recognize your target, and moves fast to teach you how to dig around what you’ve found important and the relevant data in preparation for your attack.

So, after reconnaissance, you need to scan for basics, kind of like knocking on all the doors to see who is home and what they look like. 

Then, when you find a machine that’s “live”, and need to get to know it really well, the instructor will guide you to ask it some rather personal questions like: 

  • “what OS are you running?” 
  • “what applications are you running?” 
  • “which ports are listening on the network?”.

You’ll also go over all you’ll need to know for the exam regarding scanning. 

And play with some pretty fun tools provided by the instructor along the way. 

This course is part of the Ethical Hacking Series

Rating: 4.5 stars (286 ratings).

Level: Beginner.

Updated: 2, October 2018.

Duration: 3 hours 50 minutes.

6. Ethical Hacking: Session Hijacking

This PluralSight Ethical Hacking course goes through the risks of session hijacking in-depth and helps you to become an ethical hacker with a strong session of understanding hijacking.

Did you know that session persistence is a fundamental concept in information systems? 

On the web, for example, which is dependent on the stateless HTTP protocol, session persistence is a key component of features ranging from shopping carts to the ability to log in. 

At a lower level on the network tier, the TCP protocol relies on sessions for communication between machines such as a client and a server

The confidentiality and integrity of this communication can be seriously impacted by a session hijacking attack. 

Learning how to identify these risks is an essential capability for the ethical hacker. Systems are frequently built insecurely and readily expose these flaws. 

Conversely, the risks are often easy to defend against by implementing simple patterns within the application. 

This best Ethical Hacking on PluralSight walks you through both the risks and the defenses

This course is part of the Ethical Hacking Series

Rating:4.5 stars (266 ratings).

Level: Beginner.

Updated: 16, September.

Duration: 3 hours 29 minutes.

7. Ethical Hacking: Hacking Web Servers

This Ethical Hacking course on PluralSight looks at a broad range of risks in web server implementations and more importantly, how you can defend against these risks being compromised by hackers.

Vulnerabilities in web server implementations are frequently the vector by which online attackers compromise systems. 

The impact can range from short periods of the outage, to the total disclosure of sensitive internal information. 

There are many different levels an attacker may focus their efforts on, including the application, the host operating system, and of course the web server itself. 

Each has its own weaknesses and each must have the appropriate defenses in place to ensure resiliency from online attacks. 

In this best Ethical Hacking course on PluralSight, you’ll look at various attack vectors in web servers. 

They include: 

  • Exploiting misconfigured servers 
  • Leveraging weaknesses in unpatched environments 
  • Compromising weak SSL implementations

… and much, much more. 

This course is part of the Ethical Hacking Series

Rating: 4.5 stars (266 ratings).

Level: Beginner.

Updated: 11, November 2015.

Duration: 2 hours 25 minutes 

8. Ethical Hacking: Enumeration

In this PluralSight course for Ethical Hacking, the instructor also assumes that you’ve found out “live” systems and hopefully determined the OS by fingerprinting. 

The next phase of Ethical Hacking is to extrapolate data.

Enumeration is the first official attack at your target

Enumeration is the process of gathering information that might include user names, computer names, network shares, services running, and other possible points of entry. 

This Ethical Hacking course on PluralSight will show you different techniques that can be used against your network. 

Enumeration can also be used to gain information on:

  • Network shares
  • SNMP data, if they are not secured properly
  • IP tables
  • Usernames of different systems
  • Passwords policies lists

This course is part of the Ethical Hacking Series.

Rating: 4.5 stars (174 ratings).

Level: Beginner.

Updated: 18, December 2018.

Duration: 3 hours 12 minutes.

9. Ethical Hacking: Malware Threats

This best Ethical Hacking course on PluralSight will take you deep into the dark alley of how malware is used and deployed. 

You’ll also dive into how Trojans and backdoors work.

The easiest way to get into a system or network is to get someone to let you in. 

Do you pirate software, movies, music, or heaven forbid an operating system?

 Then I’m about 99.999% sure you’ve already been owned. 

What do I mean by this?

Malware is specifically designed to gain access or damage systems without the knowledge of the victim. 

And recently, malware is on the rise due to the sheer volume of new types that are easily created daily, and the money that can be made through organized Internet crime

The instructors will tell you about the various malware types including:

  • Viruses
  • Trojans
  • Worms 

The instructor doesn’t leave you in despair, he’ll also tell you about countermeasures and ways to detect these bad boys. 

This course is part of the Ethical Hacking Series

Rating: 4.5 stars (169 ratings).

Level: Beginner.

Updated: 28, September 2018.

Duration: 3 hours 46 minutes.

10. Ethical Hacking: System Hacking

Because this is a series course on PluralSight, the tutor expects that you have actually checked out the other series for this course.

In this particular PluralSight courses for Ethical Hacking, it’s time to totally and completely “own” your target and yet make no one notice that you’ve made it in.

After you’ve done your research, you’ve found your target and identified its services, shares, users, and resources, it’s time to take total and complete control of this box. 

In turn, you will then use this box to repeat your efforts to own more boxes within the network… as well as grab any intellectual property that could be of great worth. 

This course is part of the Ethical Hacking Series

Rating: 4.5 stars (152 ratings).

Level: Beginner.

Updated: 28, September 2018.

Duration: 3 hours 54 minutes.

11. Ethical Hacking: Social Engineering

This best PluralSight Ethical Hacking course will teach you about social engineering techniques that attackers use to compromise systems and the tools you can use to fight back.

Security defenses within information systems focus primarily on technology controls, that is, security is implemented within physical appliances and software. 

These controls are frequently bypassed when the humans themselves are compromised by a social engineering attack. 

Social engineering involves compromising the individuals that use these systems. Attackers look to exploit weaknesses in human nature and coerce people into performing actions that give the attacker an advantage. 

In this Ethical Hacking course on PluralSight, you’ll look at various different social engineering techniques that can be used to compromise systems. 

You’ll also look at both computer-based and behavior-based tools to help defend against this risk

This course is part of the Ethical Hacking Series

Rating: 4.5 stars (126 ratings).

Level: Beginner.

Updated: 13, September 2019.

Duration: 4 hours 36 minutes.

Conclusion

Ethical hackers are simply self-proclaimed  “geeks” who hack on their own time, but not destructively.

An organization might hire an ethical hacker to attempt to hack their computer system within certain restrictions set by the company and country law.

If you decide to undergo white-hat hacker training, you’ll be in an excellent company. For instance, a little-known fact about Sir Timothy John Berners-Lee, best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web, is that he was a hacker in his early years.

Here is a brief summary of what you will learn from these Ethical courses on PluralSight.

  • Social engineering techniques attackers use to compromise systems
  • The dark alley of how malware is used and deployed
  • Various attack vectors in web servers
  • The risks of session hijacking in depth
  • Process of probing a system with the intent of compromising the target

I hope these Ethical Hacking courses on PluralSight help you learn the ins and outs of Ethical Hacking and launch a successful career in this lucrative field

Have you ever taken any of these best Ethical Hacking courses on PluralSight before?

If yes, please share your experience in the comments.

Lerma Gray

Hey, I’m Lerma, a mobile app developer with experience in Xamarin and React Native. I also double in as a freelance tech writer and blogger during my free time. On this blog, I share my experience about mobile app development.

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